Transcript: How To Scale A Lucrative Handmade Candle Brand

Catherine Langman:

Well, hello there. It’s Catherine Langman here back with another episode of the Productpreneur Success podcast. And today I’m really excited to welcome Jodi from Swik Home + Body onto the show.

Jodi:

Hi, Catherine.

Catherine Langman:

How are you going?

Jodi:

Good. How are you?

Catherine Langman:

Really, really good. And so, Jodi is someone I’ve been working with and getting to know over the last year and I think you’ve had an incredible journey over the last year. It’s been super exciting to watch and see you really transform your business. And so I’m very keen to share your story with our listeners. And I thought, why don’t we start just quickly with you sharing what Swik Home + Body is all about and maybe what that kind of initial business journey was like for you? So, let’s start with that first.

Jodi:

Swik Home + Body kind of started just making candles, candles and mounts and art had a full time job in a corporate office. So, I was just doing something on the side. I found making them kept me really quite calm. I’m a pretty high strung person so just stirring the little pot into all the candles it’s kind of calmed me down. So, it had a bit of a double effect.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

And I gave some candles to some friends and they absolutely loved them and I suddenly thought, “Oh, this could be something.”

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

And just kind of ran with it so I started with doing a few markets and I’m a pretty technically minded person. So, before I even launched, it was always going to be a website.

Catherine Langman:

Yes.

Jodi:

So I think a lot of people might start with just doing a Facebook page and try to sell things that way. But I didn’t launch anything until I had everything, all my products tested and burning properly and perfect kind of products and a website up and running.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. How long ago was that?

Jodi:

That was 2015.

Catherine Langman:

Okay. So, five years ago.

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

Yeah. So, it was quite a while ago, but for me, I know some people kind of say, “Oh, I thought big from the start. I was always going to make this big business.” But for me it was a bit more of a slow burn. I just never… It’s quite a saturated market.

Catherine Langman:

No pun intended?

Jodi:

Yeah. That’s it, yeah. It’s a really saturated market so it wasn’t a big thing for me. I had this slight hope in the back of my head that maybe I could leave my corporate job and be home with my kids and do this at home. That was my end goal. But I just, I never, ever imagined that it would happen. So, yeah.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. And so really initially for the first, I think, few years, wasn’t it that the majority of your sales and your business growth did come from the shops that you were doing?

Jodi:

Yeah. So, I started out with just weekend markets and one of the people who run the markets had the opportunity in the city for a popup shop. And so the cities an hour away for me so it’s quite a big deal to get everything in there and do this popup shop but I thought it sounds interesting. I’ll give it a go. And I did this one weekend in there for Saturday and a Sunday and it went nuts. And this little light bulb went on in my head. I thought, “Oh my God, this is the way to go.”

Catherine Langman:

Maybe this thing’s got some serious legs.

Jodi:

Yes, yes. Because people had bought the candles even on a Saturday and they came back on the Sunday going, Oh my God, these are amazing, I can’t believe, are you local, can we get more? The response was just quite huge. And I thought, Oh, I need to find somewhere closer to home to do this.

Catherine Langman:

Yes.

Jodi:

Yeah. So that was probably the turning point for me. And I would say that was probably about a year after I kind of kicked off, a year after doing markets and a few online sales and Facebook and things like that. But yeah, that was the turning point for me.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. Fantastic. Was that when you started to think, well, maybe I could really grow this and I could leave my corporate job?

Jodi:

Absolutely. Yeah. So, from there, I went to a shopping center that was quite local to me and I always thought, for a shopping center look at the car park, if the car park’s full.

Catherine Langman:

You should do it alright.

Jodi:

Yeah. Yeah. I’ve always said that to people, look at the car park, if it’s an empty car park, you don’t want to go there. But of course I still had my full-time job. So, I went to the center and they wanted me to book like a whole week. And I said, no, I can’t do that. Can I just book a weekend? And these people let me do that.

Catherine Langman:

Oh, great.

Jodi:

And yeah, so they had this little site that wasn’t a kind of common sight. So, they just let me book that for a weekend. So, Friday night, hubby and I would go there and set up the shop and we’d do the weekend and it just took off from there.

Catherine Langman:

Wow.

Jodi:

Really.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. How long did you keep doing that before you took the plunge and resigned from your corporate role?

Jodi:

I would say it was probably at least, probably two years. But we got to, I think we did a whole year doing these weekends on and off, and we did a few different centers the same way. And then I got offered Christmas there. So, the week before Christmas, and that was the game changer. So, I think that was in 2016. It was the year the sharks won the grand final, I remember that. Yeah, and so we had Christmas and the Christmas week is very expensive as a popup shop. So, it’s a massive risk even in just the rent.

Catherine Langman:

Right.

Jodi:

And having all the products, I didn’t know whether I was going to sell all of this stuff. I had to have a mass amount of products for this one week and it was such a big risk. We’re talking probably $10,000, for me at the time it was a big risk.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

But we did it.

Catherine Langman:

And you were still kind of early days in your business. And you’d never taken such a big risk before.

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

And, and I guess just to clarify for our listeners in Jodi’s business, Swik Home + Body, they’re actually hand-making all of their… They’re hand pouring all of their candles and making the bath bombs as well. So, they’re all made by hand. So, that’s a lot of products that you have to do when you are also working in your job.

Jodi:

Yeah. So I was getting up at 4:30, 5 o’clock in the morning and pouring before work and then going to work. And then when I got home, I’d label all the candles and pack them in boxes and then go again the next day. So…

Catherine Langman:

That’s incredible, yeah.

Jodi:

It was pretty, yeah, it was quite huge.

Catherine Langman:

Clearly a success at that particular event. Because that then snowballed and beyond that, like what was your decision making process for figuring out, because I know you’re big on numbers. So, how did you go about deciding to resign from your corporate role? I know this is something that so many people are facing.

Jodi:

So, the way that I prepped for Christmas, I went, I had a chat with the center management and I said, “How much is it? Is it like double a normal week?” And she said I’ve spoken to a few other popup shops and they’re telling me about two and a half a normal week. So, I grabbed that. I did my Christmas week, divided it by two and a half and I’m an analyst. That’s what I do, it’s the way my brain was. So, I worked at how many popup shops we’d need to do in a year. And I worked at how much those would make and did a spreadsheet and worked out the profit and thought, “I can do this.”

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. That doesn’t surprise me at all that that’s how you worked that out.

Jodi:

And funnily enough, I know you’re all about online marketing, but I actually did not even take into account the online sales at that point in time. It wasn’t a factor because online wasn’t huge for me. And it just wasn’t even a factor for me at the time. So, that was just icing on the cake, I guess.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah, totally. Cool.

Jodi:

Yeah. And then I was lucky enough to be able to ask for a year off my job to give it a go. A year on Swik. And yeah, they gave that to me. So, I was kind of lucky to be able to take the risk without, without-

Catherine Langman:

Really taking it. Yeah, that’s right. So you could completely test it and see if you could support yourself over that longer period of time.

Jodi:

Yes.

Catherine Langman:

That’s fantastic.

Jodi:

So, if I talk to anybody about this type of decision making, I always say, go for that first, try and get some time off unpaid. And see if you can make a go of it because it just takes that risk out of it.

Catherine Langman:

It does. And I mean, I suppose I kind of did it in a similar way with my first business in that I got it up and running and moving during maternity leave and yeah. And then just didn’t need to go back, which was quite handy at the time. Because I found myself pregnant already with another child, so that clearly wasn’t going to happen. But yeah. So no, that’s really, really great advice. And I think just that last point that you made where it takes a lot of the stress out of it for you because you’ve got that job there to go back to if you need to is so huge. Because I mean, I know for me, working with people who are trying to grow, if you have that, I absolutely cannot fail approach it just makes it so much harder to have the mindset where you really need to be able to work on your business and grow it.

Jodi:

Yeah. It takes a little bit of that stress away. In saying that if they had have said no, I would have resigned. I’m was just very lucky. Very, very ready to move on. I’d missed too much of my children and all the school things and whatnot. I had my youngest about to start kindergarten in the following January and I was ready to not miss out on that anymore.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. I think that’s probably a shared sentiment amongst many in our listener audience as well.

Jodi:

Oh absolutely.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. So, fast forward a couple more years and then you and I started working together late, or probably about this time 2019, so a year ago. And you’d been doing popups shops week on week off for quite a long time by then, right?

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. And they’re physically exhausting aren’t they?

Jodi:

Yeah, so candles are heavy and we don’t just do candles anymore. We do burners and diffusers and all sorts of stuff. We have six full tables full of stuff. So, we mutually just my husband and I lug it into the shop every Sunday. Like every second, Sunday night, we lug it in there and then the next week we pack it all off and take it home. So, it’s grueling. Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. And for the listeners listening, and this is not a small market table, this is like a full shop worth of stock for a week.

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. It’s a lot. So, it’s physically taxing and so I’m not surprised that when we started working together, you were pretty keen to try and shift a bit more focus to e-commerce retail. So, you could have less reliance on the physical side of the work.

Jodi:

Yes, absolutely. That was why I reached out to you. I just, I needed to not have so much reliance on the popup shop supporting us. I just needed that shift over to online sales.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah, yeah. And I suppose kind of fortuitous that you had started down that pathway because obviously a year ago, none of us knew that COVID-19 was going to happen and that we would all need to shift to e-commerce anyway.

Jodi:

Yes. Yes, absolutely.

Catherine Langman:

So, that was fortuitous. So, a year ago you were needing to get some marketing in place to really try and have your best e-commerce Christmas sales period ever. And so that was the initial focus. And of course you were still doing the shops as well at the same time. And so tell me about Christmas 2019 and what that, it was really probably six weeks of sales, really, especially the last month went crazy.

Jodi:

Yeah. So we start prepping, making, because we make everything obviously, we start prepping in around September, September, October. But when I started with you, it was all about scheduling that marketing. So, getting it all, prepped and ready so that in our really busy time where we have to make everything in the six week lead up to Christmas, we’re not thinking about all of that marketing and targeting people. It’s just all running on its own. So, you and I sat down and did a pretty clear plan for that, which was just, it really helped me because I didn’t have to think about it from October onwards. It wasn’t even a thought in my head. It all just happened.

Catherine Langman:

It all just happened. Exactly. Yeah.

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

And it did really work. I mean, I remember that I didn’t really see much of you in December because you were very busy, so yeah.

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

And I mean, just give a quick insight into that because we’re going to touch on that in a minute as well. That kind of sales volume.

Jodi:

Yeah. So, I guess, for starters I’d never done a Black Friday before. Cyber Monday. I’d never, never gotten into that before. And you were very keen on giving that a go. So, we set up some pretty targeted marketing via email campaigns and some Facebook ads. And that weekend went absolutely nuts, I’ve never seen traffic and sales like that on my website before.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

So, I guess, that was the first thing that just was amazing for the business. And then we sat down and scheduled out every email campaign in the lead up to Christmas.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. And I think you did the same with your ads as well.

Jodi:

Yes, all the ads were scheduled. Everything was set and running probably by even the start of October, I think.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. I think so.

Jodi:

And so I didn’t even have to think about those, they were just scheduled and they just went out whenever we scheduled them. And the sales came in from those. It was amazing.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah, it was, yeah.

Jodi:

It was all so new to me, but yeah, it was amazing that it all just worked.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. And then like from memory, I think you had planned how much stock that you needed to make for the shops as well as anticipating some online sales and you had to keep making more because you were selling out.

Jodi:

Yes. So, we hadn’t done Christmas at one of our centers before. And we did, not the week before Christmas, I think it was two weeks before Christmas. We did a week at the center and by the… I think we started there on the Monday, by the Tuesday we were selling out and we were going into the stock that I had already made for the big week before Christmas popup. And I think that week, I didn’t see you or our group or anything. Because I literally made candles for an entire week. So that… By the Wednesday of that week, I wasn’t going to have any candles for the Christmas week.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

At all. Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

It was incredible.

Jodi:

It was insane. We had never seen anything like it. And I’ve been saying that a lot lately, but we had just never seen anything like it.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah, yeah.

Jodi:

But at the end of the day, Christmas is Christmas. And for a business that is a gifting type business, Christmas is your period.

Catherine Langman:

SO you just suck it up.

Jodi:

You do it.

Catherine Langman:

Don’t sleep much and get it done.

Jodi:

Yep. Yep. You can sleep on boxing day.

Catherine Langman:

Which you did.

Jodi:

And pretty much for the whole of January.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. That’s right. And so you celebrated that successful festive season by going away on a beautiful holiday and you came back a little bit more refreshed, ready to go. And then of course, well, I seem to recall early in the year, your online marketing was still working as in compared to the same period the previous year, you were making more sales online than you had, but then of course, coronavirus hit. And I think, probably everyone’s business had a bit of a wobble for about a week, but then really all of that in store retail had to shift to your website because all of the shopping centers pretty much closed down, didn’t they?

Jodi:

Yes. So, mid March we had a popup running and we closed it on a Sunday. And I think the COVID thing hit fairly quickly and no one really knew what exactly was going to close. But when we closed that shop on that Sunday, I never thought that we wouldn’t reopen in a week’s time. It didn’t occur to me. And then I think on the Monday or the Tuesday, it was becoming very evident that everything was going to be closed for quite a while.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

Yah. So I cried and didn’t know what I was going to do, I think you saw me in those two weeks.

Catherine Langman:

I did and we were all-

Jodi:

I was devastated.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah, devastated because you hadn’t worked in your corporate role for a really long time and this is your livelihood and there’s a huge amount of stress there, like what’s going to happen?

Jodi:

Yeah, exactly. But you know, everything that we had done in the lead up to that, the focus on online marketing, all then came into play.

Catherine Langman:

It did, yeah.

Jodi:

It all just started to shift. And I did a couple of really focused things in that period to shift it from my shop to online. I have a lot of local business because of the popups and I gave free shipping to people in Sydney because they couldn’t get to the shop. I’ve put all of my in-stock products on the website and had a big banner with in stock products, these can be shipped the next day. And at the end of the day, every single person was sitting at home.

Catherine Langman:

Exactly. And looking around at how dismal it was and they really needed a beautiful candle to freshen the space up. Didn’t they?

Jodi:

Yeah. And all their smelly children were at home with them. And two weeks later everything went nuts and it really hasn’t stopped since.

Catherine Langman:

No.

Jodi:

Yeah. But I really do believe that all the work you and I did leading up to Christmas and even into January and February, like you said, I still had a bigger period in January, February than I had had any other year in the same period.

Catherine Langman:

Yes.

Jodi:

And all that work, just cemented the online presence and helped us get over that COVID period.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. It sure did. And credit to you because you’ve been incredibly consistent about executing on all of that marketing. So it’s one thing to have a plan of attack and to know the sorts of strategies to implement, but then you have to actually do it and you have been very consistent with that. But it’s not rocket science really, is it? The sorts of things that you’re doing.

Jodi:

No, not at all. The things that I really focused on is email marketing is actually really important. And if you’re consistent with that, I do the same days, I do two a week and I do the same days every week, date and time. And people expect to say that and when they see it, they click and they buy. And Facebook marketing, you just have to watch it and I’m an analyst so I graphed it.

Catherine Langman:

So you know it’s making money for you. That’s right.

Jodi:

Well, that’s it. Yeah. I’m not great at recording all my stats, but something that I’m paying money for, I do tend to focus on and you just graph it and you see where things are going, you scale or you bring it down or if you focus on those really key touch points of marketing, I just don’t think you can go wrong.

Catherine Langman:

No.

Jodi:

No.

Catherine Langman:

And always, focusing on building that email list and emailing consistently, you are building that email list with some of your traffic strategies, your page ads, and obviously the sort of product that you sell. It’s a bit of an impulse buy sometimes. So, you get that traffic to your site. A lot of it is going to purchase.

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

So, it definitely really works. But again, the consistency is super important and credit to you. You are very consistent with rolling this stuff out. So, that’s fantastic.

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

And so that kind of sales volume that you had in the lead up to Christmas last year, which was crazy, manic sales volume. And how does that compare with what you’re doing now, which would usually be kind of a quiet time of the year, middle of the year, winter.

Jodi:

Yeah. So I would say that now, or pretty much the past three to four months at least have been pretty much like Christmas.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

I’ve actually had to bring more help in to run the business. My husband and I both still do a lot of the work obviously, but I just got to a point where it just, there was a breaking point. I probably did it too late. I would say. But I’ve got help now.

Catherine Langman:

So, you’ve hired a couple of staff to come and help, which is bloody fantastic. And I’m very, very, very excited for you because I know what a difference it’s going to make, not least of which you’ll be able to actually get some sleep and see your kids a little bit.

Jodi:

Yes, exactly. Yep. Yep. So even, I mean, it’s only been a few weeks, but it’s made a huge difference to our life, just to get that help in. And I’m fairly consistent with my orders as well. I like to get them out the door as quickly as possible. People want their stuff quickly.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

So yeah. So it gives me time to like focus on getting that stuff out the door, make sure we’ve got everything made for the shop and I can now focus a bit closer on the marketing.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And just driving that business growth continually moving forwards and I guess, what you’re talking about here, I think this is such an important point for people to think about in advance in that it’s always great to want and go after the sales growth. And generally speaking, that’s why people come to me for help with that, which is fantastic and exciting and everything. But of course that opens up other areas of the business or identifies areas of the business that need some work. So fulfillment, the minute you have more orders, that’s more orders to pack and it’s more customer service and all of that kind of stuff. So really being able to pick the moments when you need to get that help into your business so that you can keep going is super important.

Jodi:

Absolutely. And I think you hit the nail on the head there with customer service. The minute you start getting that growth and a lot more orders, you get a lot more customers coming to you with questions about their parcels, their products at the end. So, that old just adds on.

Catherine Langman:

It does, yeah.

Jodi:

To what you do.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. So such an exciting journey and we all loved being part of it with you, Jodi and seeing the success and been very excited to share this story with the listeners. And I guess at this point, I’d love to ask if there are any sort of big or small insights or learnings that you’d pass on to someone who’s wanting to start a business or kind of early days in their business. So what’s something that’s worked really, really well and something that maybe hasn’t as well. What’s something that, a lesson that you could pass on so somebody else doesn’t need to learn it the hard way.

Jodi:

Look, I guess the biggest lesson for me is I had an issue a few years ago where my business wasn’t always called Swik Home + Body.

Catherine Langman:

Yep.

Jodi:

It was called something different. And I had registered that business name with no problem, I’d run it, I’d bought the domain names and everything like that. And when I had left my job and started full time, I thought, Oh, I better trademark this. And I logged a trademark on my own. I didn’t think to go to an IP lawyer, I did on my own. And that then opened up a huge, huge can of worms. So somebody took issue with that and-

Catherine Langman:

It was a little bit close to another trademark.

Jodi:

Yeah, it was. Yeah. So I spoke to a lot IP paid lawyers at the time and every single one of them said, it’s very different, if you wanted to fight it, you’ll win but the length of that fight and how much it would cost you is like a piece of string. So, I guess the one thing I would always say to anyone, who’s got a business, spend the money and trademark the name from the very, very start. I had built a business up that was successful and then I had to rebrand everything. I made the decision not to fight, just to change the name.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

Because their business was smaller than mine and I didn’t want to send business their way anyway. So it made sense to change the name and then trademark that. Unfortunately for me, they still had an issue with the new name. So it went on and on for eighteen months for me. And it costs a lot of money. There was a lot of stress involved with that. It was a lot of upset and I would love to save anybody from ever having to go through that.

Catherine Langman:

Just avoid that by trademarking before you get going.

Jodi:

Absolutely. It was a hard lesson to learn, but I’m not glad I went through it, but it was… I came out with Swik and I’m much happier with Swik and I’m happy with what I ended up with. So yeah. But anyone who has got a business that I ever speak to, I say to them, “Have you trademarked your name?”

Catherine Langman:

Yes. Question number one.

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. That’s a really good one to pass on. Yeah. Thank you for sharing that and what an awful, awful experience to have to go through the stress of that and the expense.

Jodi:

Oh yes. Yeah. It’s fine now. And yeah, just always trademark, think big from the start, I guess is the lesson there.

Catherine Langman:

Well that’s the things, isn’t it? And I suppose even a lot of people who do have big ambitions early on may not know that you actually do need to trademark. It’s not enough to just register the business name, just because you own the business name doesn’t mean that you own the trademark. And in fact, the trademark pretty much trumps the business name. So yeah. So yeah, really, really important. And definitely one to learn from somebody else’s experience rather than have to go through that yourself.

Jodi:

Oh yeah. Yeah, definitely. Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

And I guess on the positive side of things, what’s something that you would like to pass on that’s maybe a little bit less of a negative lesson learned? Some advice, what’s one big piece of advice that you’d love to pass on to someone.

Jodi:

Oh, look, it’s probably a bit wishy washy. And coming from an analyst it doesn’t feel right, but I always say follow your heart. I didn’t have great support in the business. I felt like I kind of had to, because it was a part time thing and is it ever going to go anywhere? And I just, I had faith in it from the beginning. I really did, I just had faith in it from the beginning. While I didn’t think big, I just knew it had legs. And I think that’s why the trademark thing hurt me so much because I felt like I put my heart and soul into this business and then somehow I felt like someone wanted to take that away. So I just, I honestly do believe if it’s something that you love and it’s something that you’re passionate about and you think that it’s going, even if you don’t think it’s going to go somewhere, if it’s something that you want just fight for it.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

And follow it through. And I know when I was thinking about coming to work with you, our friend Vicki recommended you to me and I kept going back and forth with her. And she said this thing to me, she goes, “Jodi, invest in yourself.” And use it, don’t even think about it. And from the minute she said that I called you.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah.

Jodi:

Right away. And just invested, invest in yourself and fight for what you want.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. And I think, for me, when I first spoke with you and I say this to anyone that I speak to who is thinking they might need help or wondering what the next right step is. I understand because I’ve been through this too, it is hard to have the confidence in knowing when’s the right decision to make a big step, investing in anything in your business, in any area of your business. But you already had such secure proof of concept with your business. You were making consistent revenue, it was very clear that people loved your product and you were selling a lot of it already without a huge amount of marketing happening. And so once you’ve got that in place, you can be confident in yourself to back yourself and go for it, which thankfully you did.

Jodi:

Yes. Yep. And I also always, it always does make me think when people have a small business and they don’t have an online website. I always think it’s the way the world is now. There’s so many ways to create a website these days. But yeah, don’t ever launch a business without a website. I don’t think it’s the way to go.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah, definitely.

Jodi:

Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

And so I know that it’s not like the whole world is out of the Corona situation now, but shopping centers are back open. So you are doing popups again, you’re doing your shops again.

Jodi:

I am, yeah.

Catherine Langman:

And it hasn’t had an impact on your online sales. Your online sales are still going completely nuts, which is super exciting. Obviously none of us have a crystal ball, but I definitely am of the opinion and I know that I’ve read some opinion pieces by economists recently that it’s been so many months now where customers have changed their behavior and are now shopping online in ways that they never did before and in volumes that they never did before. This really is the way that commerce works now. People shop online probably from their mobile a lot more than they ever used to. And so you’re enjoying this kind of area of growth and your business has really taken off online, which is exciting. But yeah, like I think what you just said is so true, we all need to just accept this is the way business is now and just get on with it.

Jodi:

Yes, exactly. Exactly. I mean, I have a lot of older customers that come to the shop and when we had to close, they would call me going, “Oh, how am I going to get my stuff?” And I’ve sat on the phone with them and they were on in front of a computer or a device or something. And I just worked through them until they got to the checkout stage and they got their order and they got it sent to them and they would message me and go, “Oh my God, it came.” And I was like, “Yup, yup.”

Catherine Langman:

Oh, how exciting.

Jodi:

And there’s so many people who now come to me at the store going, “Oh my God, it’s so good that I can order online from you.” And it’s a huge shift. Huge shift.

Catherine Langman:

Yeah. How exciting is that? I love it.

Jodi:

It is. Yeah.

Catherine Langman:

Brilliant. Awesome. All right. So to finish us off, just share your web address and your social media handles if you’d like to share those as well. And so that everyone knows where to go to get their candles and home fragrance stuff.

Jodi:

So it’s Swik, S W I K Home + Body and it’s www.swikhomebody.com.au and we’re on Facebook and Instagram as with swikhomebody.

Catherine Langman:

Yay. Awesome. And I will definitely link to those from the podcast show notes page as well. So anyone who’s looking for help with any of that definitely head there and I can definitely attest as well, they work a treat when you’ve got teenagers at home and you want your place to smell a bit nicer.

Jodi:

Yes.

Catherine Langman:

Awesome. Well, thank you so much for joining us on the show today. Really appreciate you sharing your story and your insights from your business.

Jodi:

Thanks, Catherine.