Discover how to use quizzes on your shopify store

Well hello there! Catherine Langman here with you on the Productpreneur Success Podcast! Welcome to the show if you’re a new listener, and welcome back if you’re a long-time listener!

At the time that I’m recording this episode in late April 2022, online store owners are faced with a couple of pressing challenges in their business:

With the massive increase in the number of eCommerce businesses selling online, our customers are now faced with a lot more choice of who to shop with. Now, more than ever before, we need to move away from operating with a website that’s kinda generic in the way it presents to customers, so the imagery and language and the way a website visitor might navigate your site. Being too generic like this, or too similar to the competition, does not cut through the clutter of a competitive marketplace and it does not help convince a customer of what they should purchase or why they should purchase from you specifically.

Secondly, in a business environment post-Apple iOS 14 and 15, with the restrictions in terms of data tracking that we’re all now forced to operate within, it’s also absolutely critical for us to find ways to collect our own customer data rather than relying exclusively on data tracked by third party platforms, whether that’s google analytics or your Facebook pixel or whatever. 

We would all be shooting ourselves in the foot if we just stopped advertising on those platforms, but equally we need to find ways to track and collect and make sense of our own customer data and use that to feed back into those other platforms.

The brands who can solve both these problems are going to be clear winners in terms of increased revenue and also increased profitability of their marketing and advertising.

What if I told you that it’s possible to achieve both with just one strategy? Would you want to know what that is? 

Well, you’re in luck, because my guest on the show today is going to hand it to us on a silver platter.

I’d love to welcome Gen Furukawa to the show. Gen is one of the founders of the quiz platform Prehook, which is a tool you use with Shopify stores and also integrates with Klaviyo, so I’m in love already. 

So without further ado, let’s welcome Gen to the show and hear all about how we can grow a more engaged drive more revenue through personalised marketing experiences.

Catherine Langman:
Welcome to the show again. It’s absolutely fantastic to have you here. To get us started today I would really love to invite you to just introduce yourself, tell us, where are you from? What are you all about? And let’s go from there.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. Catherine, first of all, thank you so much for having me. I’m very excited. Yeah, my name is Gen Furukawa, I’m a co-founder of Prehook, which is a quiz platform for Shopify merchants. And we launched in 2021, started building in 2020 with a couple friends from a previous company that I worked at. We were part of the founding team at Jungles Scalp, which is an Amazon product research tool, kind of like the leader.

Catherine Langman:
Cool.

Gen Furukawa:
In the software space for Amazon sellers. And we’ve been working together since 2015 and kind of like we’d all left and started doing our own thing, realized that we wanted to work together on an e-commerce SaaS product and realized that the challenges of an Amazon seller are slightly different than that of an e-commerce brand that’s driving traffic to their own site. Namely, what problem are they solving and how do they know what problem they’re solving?

Gen Furukawa:
Amazon, for example, is highly SEO focused. Maybe like what some of your money keywords are, those search queries that most of your customers are searching for and that’s where you want your… Like kind of the sweet spot of your customer. For a brand it’s slightly different. As in, you don’t know what your customer’s looking for. You don’t necessarily know what problem you’re trying to solve, but if you ask a few questions, then you can do a lot in terms of how you personalize your marketing, how you change positioning, or how you appeal to the customer in terms of the benefits and the features that you offer. We did a fair amount of customer research realized that there wasn’t really a great tool that eCommerce brands were using to do that.

Catherine Langman:
No, not with Shopify there.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. It’s in some ways. And this was even just two years ago, kind of retrofitting type form in some ways, which you could capture the data, but it doesn’t integrate as well. We built a quiz platform specifically for Shopify. We deeply integrate with Shopify so that you could ask your questions. It all gets sent through to some of the main email service providers say Klaviyo, Omnisend send attentive and post script and then capture a lead or recommend products. We simplify the buying process and therefore improve conversion rate. And then the third benefit, which is perhaps the most important these days is capturing zero party data, which is-

Catherine Langman:
Yes.

Gen Furukawa:
Data that your customers share directly and willingly with you. Actually maybe I can take a step back and define, zero party data as it relates to the first party data, which lots of brands are kind of like tracking past the lead. First party data is data that you’re capturing just based on your user’s action. That might be order history, what they purchase, how much they’ve spent, maybe it’s how they engage with your website, say what page they go to, what they do as an abandoned card or abandoned checkout, maybe how they’re engaging with your email. Are they opening? Are they clicking through? Those are good, but the challenge is you know the what but you don’t know the why.

Catherine Langman:
Mm.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. And so that’s kind of the gap that we’re we’re filling in is understanding kind of the mindset of your customer. And from there, you can do a lot in terms of segmentation, in terms of creating different flows, based on what they are looking for in terms of the positioning dynamic personalization of the actual emails or SMS. That’s where we’re right now-

Catherine Langman:
I love this. It’s so cool. Let’s give our audience a little bit of an example. I guess a lot of our audience would be brands that are typically for women and children. I guess, you can think about things like skincare and makeup and accessories and fashion. And I mean, there’s others as well, but those would capture a big proportion. I know that I have tried to do exactly what you said before, where you try and retro fit another platform and try and get it to talk to Shopify and to Klaviyo, but it’s pretty clunky, but we did have some really good success with a makeup quiz, because that’s a really hard product to sell online. Can you give us some examples or maybe like, walk us through a really good case study of using a quiz and then how it actually helps customers to make that purchase decision a little bit more easily.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, makeup is a great example, food and beverage, fragrance and all of the niches that you mentioned. And the reason I think that makeup is particularly popular is because it is hard to buy online. For makeup, for example, you might find a foundation finder to match the exact skin tone with the product. Because if you go to… In America there’s stores like Sephora or say a Nordstrom, you can dap it on to your skin and see how the tone matches. Obviously not so easy to do online. And that’s exactly kind of like cutting to the chase of what a quiz can do.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
Which is simplify it so that it’s easy for us to understand what product is best. Like a skincare brand, for example, or makeup brand maybe they might be… Might ask, what occasion are you looking for? Whether it’s office or going out or a date night or working out, maybe what problems are you experiencing? Do you have breakouts? Do you have dry skin? Do you have oily skin? That might kind of like categorize the customer and then maybe like what their goals are. Some of the main questions that I think are best in terms of like the brand that come to us and say, “Hey, we need to learn more about it, but how do we structure it?” And I think if you understand what challenges your customers facing, as in like what’s their current state, what’s their goal? Like where do they wish to aspire to be? Is critical, maybe some of the habits. And then that’s essentially what our job is as e-commerce marketers is to bridge a gap from their current state to their aspirational state.

Catherine Langman:
Yes.

Gen Furukawa:
And the way they that you get there is by inserting your product. So say, your foundation can get this person with dry skin, with a tendency to breakouts or acne, to feel confident and lively or glamorous. And here’s a product that you can do it. And then you can kind of like peel back the layers. Here’s how you’ll do it. Here’s why our products good. Here are some customer testimonials that our customers have had who are in the same exact boat as you with the same conditions or tendencies. And here’s what they have to say about the product. So this is kind of like what I was talking about earlier, like with just a few pieces of data, you can really craft like a very compelling narrative, as opposed to if it’s just like a blanket statement and you don’t really know, you can’t really speak to the pains of that individual customer.

Catherine Langman:
You’re trying to get from generic marketing to specific marketing and make it really relevant to the different kind of buckets or different segments of your custom base.

Gen Furukawa:
Absolutely. Yeah, absolutely. I think that’s really where marketing for e-commerce brands is going. Which is this focus on hyper-personalization that no, no longer will a one and done campaign blast work and there’s quantitative empirical data to back that up. I think it was Accenture that had a study on personalization and the state of e-commerce brand. And so e-commerce customers are willing to share more data like personal data are willing to, or will actually spend more so higher AOB purchase more frequently on a repeated basis and therefore have higher customer lifetime value if there is like on the other end, a use case or that their customer experience is enhanced based on the data that they’re sharing. But here’s a rub is that brands are struggling to actually deliver on that personalized experience. And that’s called-

Catherine Langman:
It’s technically challenging, I suppose, for a lot of people.

Gen Furukawa:
Well, yeah. I mean, whether it’s the tools so that the technical knowhow, or even just the data. Knowing how to personalize or knowing what to personalize around, those are challenges that brands are facing. And so that’s a customer experience gap. And that’s where brands can really excel and stand out. And the customer experience is if they are say, for example, sending Catherine something specific to her foundation or her tone or skin tone type that would speak volumes over kind of like a generic blast of like, “Hey, it’s summer. Here’s a sunscreen that you might like.”

Catherine Langman:
Yes. One is going to hit the mark and be a lot more cut through in messaging than the other biological.

Gen Furukawa:
Absolutely.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah. I think early, when we started talking. You were talking about, asking a few questions. I guess I’d like to know how do you guys kind of help the brand owners to know what questions to ask, is there some research that they need to do or walk us through that little process there? Because I imagine there would be an element of overwhelm the first time you try and put together a quiz.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. I think the best place to start is to think about how you would use a data and what type of data you would need to use. That’s kind of specifically talking about segmentation. What is most important? We can use like, say a wine brand. Wine or coffee are very popular-

Catherine Langman:
I like both.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. And so do I, I know in Australia there’s really great coffee or great wine.

Catherine Langman:
Both. Yes.

Gen Furukawa:
Well, do you grow coffee in Australia?

Catherine Langman:
We do. Not in south Australia but yes.

Gen Furukawa:
Oh yeah. Made it sound more so like Indonesia-

Catherine Langman:
We have olive oil and wine down here.

Gen Furukawa:
There you go, olive oil as well. Basically, you would want to know how would I use the data? What type of segments would I need on the back end in order to execute on this personalization strategy. If it were, say coffee, maybe it’s like what the flavor profile, as in, is it fruity or nutty or chocolatey or is it based on roast type? Is it based on caffeinated versus decaf? Is it based on somebody who likes drip coffee versus espresso? Those are the types of things that you might have different segments for in your Klaviyo or Omnisend. Therefore that would tell you… It would be helpful to ask these questions in the quiz. Now of course you can ask as much as you want. The trade off is for every question that you ask, there is a likelihood of somebody dropping off. So you can imagine, like, what we see is a completion rate would drop off with every question asked. In our quizzes, we see like 70 to 85% completion rate.

Catherine Langman:
Okay.

Gen Furukawa:
But you want to be careful.

Catherine Langman:
Is there like a sweet spot then of how many questions to ask.

Gen Furukawa:
Well, it kind of differs based on what the use case is. If it’s something maybe a little bit more medical focus.

Catherine Langman:
Fair enough.

Gen Furukawa:
Or like a lead qualification, then it’s fair to ask more.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
But if it’s something that’s just supposed to aid in the shopping experience, I think-

Catherine Langman:
Fewer.

Gen Furukawa:
Calling it down to the bare minimum is ideal.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah. I guess it’s crucial then as the brand, who’s kind of creating this quiz, you need to know what is the real question that’s going to be able to segment into those different options rather than nice to have information. What is that critical question that you have to ask?

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. I would say, what are your challenges? Because that’s going to be kind of the north star of what the problem that you’re solving.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
Maybe so your challenges, maybe it’s your goals and then stuff around maybe preferences.

Catherine Langman:
Love that. And then from there, once you’ve got this quiz, I mean, I guess actually, while you are putting together your quiz questions as well, I imagine if you can make them a little bit kind of fun and engaging and entertaining as well, that would help people go all the way through versus something that’s really kind of boring or-

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah.

Catherine Langman:
Just a fun incitement.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. I mean, that’s totally true. And in some ways maybe that’s where copywriting comes in.

Catherine Langman:
Mm. Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
But if there are questions, like, for example, if you were a season? What season would you be? Or if you could go on vacation, what would your vacation destination be?

Catherine Langman:
Which celebrity do you-

Gen Furukawa:
I mean, those are great. Those are kind of like the buzz feed type quizzes where you can like categorize people. And if you want to kind of go that route, there are brands that do that successfully, but what are you trying to do with a quiz? And I think the first goal might be to improve conversion rate, right? Ultimately driving revenue is the critical end goal, then it will be accelerate list growth. So you’re capturing a late so you want to make sure that the hook that you’re in the quiz is compelling enough that people would A, want to take the quiz and then B offering their contact information so that they can learn more and you can send them information. And then third part is of course the customer data.

Catherine Langman:
Yes, absolutely. Before we talk about that customer data a little bit more. Tell us a little bit about how you can personalize the email marketing after somebody’s gone through it. Let’s say for instance, somebody’s gone through, they’re trying to select the right foundation for their makeup or something like that. And they get a recommendation, but they’re not ready to buy yet. They might opt in, maybe there’s a coupon code or something like that, but then what happens? Because I know it’s very… I see a lot of small businesses starting up and they’re trying to get their email marketing going, but it’s one flow and there’s-

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah.

Catherine Langman:
Do you know what I mean?

Gen Furukawa:
Sure.

Catherine Langman:
What can we do and how does it work?

Gen Furukawa:
I’m going to take this as an indication that we’re going to dive into the weeds now, so we can get tactical.

Catherine Langman:
Our audience is a big kind of Klaviyo crowd.

Gen Furukawa:
Perfect. Okay.

Catherine Langman:
So go for it.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah, post quiz. The way… Prehook we send the data through as an event metric and as a custom property. That means basically you can like trigger a flow once you get a product recommendation.

Catherine Langman:
Yes.

Gen Furukawa:
I recommend waiting maybe like 30 minutes or so, or 15 minutes after they take the quiz and then you just do a conditional split. Did they purchase or not? If they didn’t purchase, then you can send the follow up and maybe if you added an incentive, like a discount, then you can include it in there.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
And then if… What would that email look like? That’s where you would include the dynamic personalization and that’s where it helps in the way that we send the data through so that you would just have placeholders. It would be like-

Catherine Langman:
Love that.

Gen Furukawa:
“Hey, Catherine, here is the product that we think is best for you.” It is the, and then you would add product title, you would add product name or product image. You would link that image to the product description page. And then basically like it would just be one template that would just be placeholders of the recommended product. You would get your email. I would get maybe a very different email, but it would be the same template. It would be the same flow.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
Then

Catherine Langman:
Not multiple email flows.

Gen Furukawa:
Well, you don’t need to do that, but you can. Then right after that, so this is essentially like the replacing the welcome flow.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
Or it could be, or it could just be a post quiz flow, but then you can say have conditional splits where if the contact has dry skin then send in this email, if the contact has oily skins, send in this email.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
And then you can kind of like tailor there and then you can have multiple conditional splits going all the way down.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
And you can also do… Oh, sorry, go ahead.

Catherine Langman:
The opportunity is really, to personalize the information that you send is almost endless by the sounds of things. I mean, it’s not just showing the right product images and titles and whatnot, but also having the right customer testimonials that’s relevant to that recommendation. Even presumably down the track with ongoing marketing, if you have new ranges coming out, you could sort your list based on, who’s going to be the right audience for the new products and all kinds of stuff. It’s very exciting.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. And that’s where I was saying, like the personalization is such an opportunity, especially once you have the data that you can extend to like any number of emails. And we haven’t even really talked about SMS, which the data is incredibly important because SMS is such a highly personal and engagement is so high that you can kind of like step outside of the bounds of overextend you’re welcome with too many campaigns or campaigns that aren’t relevant. And you’ve been on the receiving end, as I’m sure as if I. Let’s just say stop. And it’s so quick to unsubscribe, which is a killer. I mean, you’re losing money because you may be paid to acquire that lead. And then that lead also has an incredibly high conversion rate. I mean, of course it depends on per store. It might be anywhere from like 15, 20, 25% of all online revenue might come from SMS depending on how much a brand is using it. But SMS is a critical channel. And so you want to like, definitely use as much personal data that you’ve gathered as possible.

Catherine Langman:
I guess, Klaviyo view’s helping us to do that.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah.

Catherine Langman:
These too. Actually the SMS marketing with Klaviyo was quite slow to launch in Australia, but it’s here as of this year. That’s great. Yeah, absolutely. You just triggered a thought for me before I wanted to ask you, do you have any data around increased conversion rates from being able to personalize these recommendations to potential customers?

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah, that’s a good question. I personally don’t, I don’t really have purview into, on the email end of it, but for brands that use a quiz we are definitely seeing and hearing from brands, those that take the quiz versus those that do not take the quiz, those that take the quiz have a higher average order value, have a higher conversion rate.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
One brand I think is like three X, the conversion rate. [TLexar 00:20:07], which is… It’s actually based in Australia, an adapted gen brand. Yeah-

Catherine Langman:
That’s compelling.

Gen Furukawa:
The conversion rate, if, and you can look at this, in Prehook where you can definitely verify in Google analytics, you basically like create a custom event of taking a quiz and then you’re quitting segments of quiz versus not. And so it’s definitely a higher… It’s a higher value customer because especially if you think about, “Okay, I’m just adding an opt in, whether the opt in is like, join our VIP club or save 20% off on your first order, enter email to receive the code.

Gen Furukawa:
That’s a particularly dangerous slippery slope because that 15 per 20%, whatever, that’s kind coming directly from the top line revenue, and it’s also impacting brand equity in terms of like, okay, what does that say about the brand or the value of the brand or the prices that are on the webpage, if you’re just kind of like offering a discount within the first 20 seconds of being on the site. It’s kind of like conditioning a customer to either look for that or just discount the brand in their mind. Nevermind the fact that you’re just kind of like getting an email with not a whole lot of information behind it.

Catherine Langman:
Exactly it irks me a lot.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah.

Catherine Langman:
I want to ask you a little bit more about the opportunities with this data that you can collect as well. Obviously, having a quiz helps us to help customers make that purchase decision and that initial goal is to increase our conversion rate, increase our revenue and all of that kind of stuff. But how does the data that you’re collecting then integrate with maybe some other platforms and open up opportunities, things like advertising and creating audiences and that’s sort of thing.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah, that’s a great question. I think that’s kind of like one of the really sneaky cool ways of using the data. Omnisend does this, Klaviyo as well, but basically you can create segments.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
Like the same segments that again, if it were like somebody who likes merlo and so that could be one segment, create a segment that can be automatically sent to say your Facebook ads platform or Google ads platform, and then that would be a segment or an audience in those platforms. And then therefore the landing page would correlate to that. Then you’d be sending them products or landing pages specific to merlo or chardonnay. And so there’s that alignment of like what you’ve gathered as well as kind of like carries through, to say remarketing campaign, if I’m on another site. And then I see Naked Wines is offering an ad. It would be a disconnect in customer experience, if I were just kind of offering, “Hey, take a quiz or drink this wine that you might not like.”

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
Click on on this ad to learn more.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah. So cool. Because I mean, obviously since the Apple iOS update last year that the data passing from pixel triggered on the Shopify site to these platforms, advertising platforms is not as accurate anymore. If we can supplement-

Gen Furukawa:
Exactly.

Catherine Langman:
Like this, then that’s amazing. What else do we need to talk about with Prehook quizzes? Do you want to give us a little bit more of a spiel? Like where would our audience go to learn more? How do they get started all of that kind of good stuff.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah, totally. It’s prehook.com, P-R-E-H-O-O-K.com. And so, we’re a quiz platform. 14 day free trial. Happy to help set up any quiz or answer any questions. Feel free to email me Gen, its G-E-N@prehook.com

Catherine Langman:
You might have just opened a pandora’s box with that offer.

Gen Furukawa:
I mean, like take it, I really do mean it.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
That’s kind of the fun thing of speaking on these podcasts is connecting with people who I might not otherwise know. And likewise, they might not know me.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
But I think going into 2022, and we’re already almost halfway through 2022, the same with building a list, like it applies to gathering customer data. When’s the best time to do it is yesterday.

Catherine Langman:
Yesterday.

Gen Furukawa:
But if you haven’t then starting now and being thoughtful about what data you’re gathering and then how that would actually be implemented in a tactical way in your marketing campaigns. And it’s mainly in your communications. That’ll be your email, your SMS, your paid ads, your onsite experience.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah.

Gen Furukawa:
But the customer data is going to be more and more important, especially as you alluded to iOS 15 iOS 14.5 third party cookies being deprecated, next year-

Catherine Langman:
We will get onto it.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. The blueprint of how brands could run profitable campaigns is changing and it’s ever more important and urgent to build a direct relationship with customers.

Catherine Langman:
Yeah. I think what I love so much, and I guess just to summarize as well for our audience is using a quiz such as what Prehook allows us to do on Shopify. Not only, I mean, it’s a win-win, I think it’s going to give our customers a much better experience when they’re browsing on our website and shopping on our website. It’s better for the customer, but it’s also going to provide so much upside for us as business owners because of the increased conversions, but also this crucial data that we will… Data, I say it in an Aussie way that we’re all going to need as business owners. Yeah, really, really exciting to have you on the show and share all this stuff. I urge all of our audience to go and check you out and sign up for a 14 day trial. We’ll share links to Prehook on our podcast show notes and hopefully encourage a few people to take you up.

Gen Furukawa:
Yeah. Fantastic.

Catherine Langman:
Thank you so much for jumping on the show with me today. Again, it’s been an absolute pleasure to have you here.

Gen Furukawa:
That was awesome. Thanks so much, Catherine.